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Andre Berto: Saga continues



 Andre Berto: Saga continues Debuting on December 4th, 2004, Andre Berto showed much promise from the beginning of his pro career. Michael Robinson was the first of twenty-two victims that failed to hear the final bell. Stopping David Estrada in 2007 for the NABF Welterweight title, and knocking out Miguel Angel Rodriguez in 2008 for the vacant WBC Welterweight title, Berto up to this point, fulfilled all the promise and praise laid upon him.

Knockouts of Quintana and Hernandez heading into the Ortiz fight, Berto looked to tick all the boxes coming in. In an all action shootout, it was Ortiz who prevailed, taking the decision. Coming off his first pro loss, Berto next bested Jan Zaveck, and once again approached a golden opportunity. Robert ‘The Ghost’ Guerrero next stood in front of the top tier gateway. Although only having one bout at 147, Guerrero had all the credentials to be in this spot. Living up to his moniker, ‘The Ghost’, Guerrero proved a nightmare for Berto, and after twelve punishing rounds was awarded the decision. Another key loss for Andre Berto.

A change was in order, and Berto linked up with trainer Virgil Hunter. Coming into the Soto-Karass bout, Berto brought two high profile losses in his last three outings. A pattern was being laid for all to see. Berto couldn’t win the fights that really counted. The knockout loss that followed to Soto-Karass, solidifies the belief Berto just doesn’t belong in the elite bracket of 147.

I am not willing to write off Andre Berto by any means. But, I think Muhammad Ali put it best, “A fighter must have skill and will. But the will must out weigh the skill”. What happens when you have that formula but still fall short?